Why coaching is good for your health

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I read an article recently that outlined that most people are only able to work in good health for 10 years after they turn 50. The article was about the need to raise the retirement age because people are living longer, but it was very clear that living longer doesn’t mean living in good health.

I find that pretty alarming, although unfortunately not hugely surprising. In the world today we are all experiencing greater pressure than ever. In particular it seems that women are feeling more pressure than ever before.

Whether it comes from our job, commute, children or childcare pressures, our partner, elderly parents, the feeling that we need to do more in our communities, to spend more time with our friends, to find more time to relax, or from any other of the many things that require our attention.

There’s no doubt that life is full of pressures and that can be stressful

The impact of pressure or stress can result in a multitude of negative feelings and emotions. This often impacts our energy levels and our mood which is inconvenient and can make our days more difficult than they would otherwise be. There is a MUCH bigger issue with being stressed or anxious on a regular basis though.

The link between our minds and our body can’t be understated

When we feel well in our minds we are often healthy in our bodies, but the opposite is also true. When our minds are filled with stress, anxiety, negative thoughts and feelings, it very often presents itself in our bodies.

Do you regularly experience any of the following?

irritability

anxiety

depression

headaches

insomnia

muscle tension

IBS

Our bodies are affected by our mental state in so many ways

When we experience stress our heart pumps faster, stress hormones cause your blood vessels to constrict and send more oxygen to your muscles so you’ll have more strength to take action. The downside is that this also raises your blood pressure.

Raised blood pressure, usually as a result of frequent or chronic stress, increases the risk of a stroke or heart attack. Our liver produces extra glucose (blood sugar) under stress, to give us energy boosts.

Ongoing exposure to chronic stress may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Stress can impact our digestive system, this can mean we are more regularly affected by stomach aches, constipation, diarrhoea, nausea or even vomiting. Cortisol is released in response to stress, long term exposure to cortisol can contribute to weight gain.

When we’re stressed our muscles tense up to protect themselves from injury, they release when we relax. If we’re continuously stressed though, they may not relax and tight muscles cause headaches, back and shoulder pain and other aching muscles. If that leads to less exercise, because it’s uncomfortable, then that can exacerbate stress further, because exercise is a good way of combating stress.

Over time stress hormones weaken our immune system

People suffering from stress are more susceptible to colds, flu & other viruses, as well as an increased time for recovery from illness or injury.

The truth is that the human body is designed to experience stress about once a month. In reality though, adrenalin is coursing through our bodies multiple times a day, leaving us on edge, exhausted & potentially causing serious damage to our health.

It is possible to reduce your stress levels by changing the way that you react to things that cause you to be stressed, even if you can’t change the actual stressor itself. I believe that people are far more stressed than they need to be & I want to help you to be better equipped to deal with stressful things more easily.

Imagine how much better your life could be if you were able not to be stressed by the many things that are stressing you out today.

If you’d like to make a change in any area of your life then get in touch for your FREE 30 minute clarification call and we can discuss how I can help you.

Do something today that your future self will thank you for!

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